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Our Communities

Lake View Credit Union proudly serves three communities in the south Peace. We’d like to give you a little information on these vibrant, proud places.

DAWSON CREEK

Dawson Creek is a small city in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. The municipality encompasses 20.66 square kilometers (7.98 sq mi) with a population of 11,811 in 2007. Dawson Creek derives its name from the creek of the same name that runs through the community. The creek was named after George Mercer Dawson by a member of his land survey team when they passed through the area in August 1879. Once a small farming community, Dawson Creek became a regional centre when the western terminus of the Northern Alberta Railways was extended there in 1932.

The community grew rapidly in 1942 as the US Army used the rail terminus as a transshipment point during construction of the Alaska Highway. In the 1950s, the city was connected to the interior of British Columbia via a highway and railway through the Rocky Mountains.
Dawson Creek is known as the service centre for the rural areas south of the Peace River.  The city has been called the “Capital of the Peace”, and is also known as the “Mile 0 City”, referring to its location at the southern end of the Alaska Highway. The community is home to a heritage interpretation village, an art gallery, and a museum. Annual events include a fall fair and a spring rodeo.

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CHETWYND

Chetwynd is a small town in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in northeastern British Columbia,  Situated on an ancient floodplain, it is the first town encountered after emerging from the Rockies along Highway 97 and acts as the gateway to the Peace River Country. The town developed during the construction of infrastructure through the Rocky Mountains in the 1950s, and was used as a transshipment point during the construction of hydroelectric dams in the 1960s and 1970s. It was also a critical staging point during the construction of Tumbler Ridge in the early-1980s. Home to approximately 2,600 residents, the population has increased little in the last 25 years but is significantly younger than the provincial average.Once known as Little Prairie, the community adopted its current name in honour of provincial politician Ralph L.T. Chetwynd just prior to its incorporation in 1962.

The 64 square kilometre (25 sq mi) municipality consists of the town, a community forest, and four exclave properties. Chetwynd has dozens of chainsaw carvings displayed throughout town as public art and is home to the weekly newspaper, the Chetwynd Echo, and a Northern Lights College campus. Nearby, there are four provincial parks, two lakes, and several recreational trails.
Highways 29 and 97 intersect in town with Highway 97 connecting it to Prince George and Dawson Creek and Highway 29 to Tumbler Ridge and Hudson’s Hope. A rail line branches off in three directions: northward to Fort St.John and east to Dawson Creek and west through the Rockies to Prince George. Its economy is dominated by the primary industries of forestry, fossil fuel extraction, and transportation. Chetwynd is also a gateway to outdoor recreation, which includes hiking, mountain biking, camping, golf, fishing, swimming, canoeing and boating.

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TUMBLER RIDGE

Tumbler Ridge is a small town in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in northeastern British Columbia, Canada, and a member municipality of the Peace River Regional District. The municipality of 1,574 square kilometres (608 sq mi), with its population of 2,454 people, incorporates a townsite and a large area of mostly Crown land. The housing and municipal infrastructure, along with regional infrastructure connecting the town to other municipalities, were built simultaneously in 1981 by the provincial government to service the coal industry as part of the British Columbia Resources Investment Corporation’s Northeast Coal project.In 1981, a consortium of Japanese steel mills agreed to purchase 100 million tonnes of coal over 15 years for US$7.5 billion from two mining companies,, Denison Mines Inc. and the Teck Corporation, who were to operate the Quintette mine and the Bullmoose mine, respectively. Declining global coal prices after 1981, and weakening Asian markets in the late 1990s, made the town’s future uncertain and kept it from achieving its projected population of 10,000 people. The uncertainty dissuaded investment and kept the economy from diversifying. When price reductions were forced onto the mines, the Quintette mine ceased production in 2000 and the town lost about half its population. Since 2000 rising coal prices have led to the opening of new mines in and near the municipality by Northern Energy & Mining Inc. and Western Canadian Coal.

After dinosaur footprints, fossils, and bones were discovered in the municipality, along with fossils of Triassic fishes and cretaceous plants, the Peace Region Paleontology Research Centre opened in 2003. The research centre and a dinosaur museum were funded in part by the federal Western Economic Diversification Canada to decrease economic dependence on the coal industry. Economic diversification has also occurred with oil and gas exploration, forestry, and recreational tourism. Nearby recreational destinations include numerous trails, mountains, waterfalls, snowmobiling areas and provincial parks, such as the Monkman Provincial Park, Bearhole Lake Provincial Park, and the Gwillim Lake Provincial Park.

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